Anomaly by Michael Gilwood

Michael Gilwood (1)

Michael Gilwood is the Pen name for Stephen Woodward. Michael’s writing career began at the age of nine; writing children’s columns in the local Kentish newspaper. At seventeen, he started to write short stories and poems. After reading hundreds of books, he blamed his nearness to writing to the overly imaginative works of Verne, not because it was his first, it was he who could deliver his then childish mind, making him wonder how someone could vividly paint an invisible image inside his head. He was fascinated by the power of literature. Since then he enjoyed writing, enjoying the pleasure it brought to others. He found it a way to escape from the real world, inserting himself within his own. His other works include: DOK. Both books are available on Amazon.

Science Fiction Novel- Anomaly Synopsis:Anomaly

When two-hundred year old human remains are found on one of Neptune’s moons, Earth’s history falls into chaos. The momentous discovery points planet earth towards a solar system a thousand light years away. Twenty years later, Captain Philip Wakefield and his team, onboard the starship Excelsior, reaches the solar system of Mintaka and continues the investigation. But they are not the only thing evolving in the galaxy. Something frightening has them in its sights. Their discovery of the very cradle of humankind becomes a struggle for interstellar survival. This science fiction book is sure to excite your senses and imagination of the world of space.

weltron-urban_regular                                                                         Exerpt

“My name is Philip. This is Alana and Ramaan. We are scientists. We have come here to gather information about this planet, its life-forms and cultures, its riches and composition and then we will move on to the next planet in this system we call Phot. We come from Earth, the third planet of a G7 star in the centauri region.”

“We know why you have come. Here, you’ll need a flask of Amostalina for your woman.” Shar gave them a small phial of white liquid for Lexia and smiled.

“Almost twenty-thousand of your years ago, we lived in peace in your solar system on the planet you call Mars. Everything was perfect. Everything was as it should have been until the war between the Gorinos, or the dark ones and us, began. At the same time, a terrible disease struck Mars. It drifted quietly and almost destroyed us. As a result, we separated and fled to different parts of the galaxy to escape the impending doom that encircled us. We have our Platnios outside to warn us of intruders. It was them who told us of your arrival.”

“Those plant creatures, you call them Platnios?” Philip’s confidence suddenly came back with a rush. He felt at ease. Shar sensed it, and smiled again.

“They are territorial; if you don’t provoke them, they won’t hurt you.” Ramaan felt an urge to roll up his sleeve and show Shar his arm.

“They are genetically made to serve and obey us?” He moved forward and gave them a book written in their language. Philip was sure his gift would help Lexia with her translations. Ramaan meanwhile was taking photographs of interest and sending the results to Sentrywatcher.

“How is it that you are familiar with the English Language?” asked Philip.

“It is our second language and the mother tongue of our descendants. Come, I will show you and your crew our hangar and what we are doing here.”

Buy Link: http://www.amazon.com/Anomaly-Michael-Gilwood/dp/098918823X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1387471047&sr=8-1&keywords=michael+gilwood

Website: http://stevewoodenpoets.wix.com/books
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Michael-Gilwood/461276787313105

Sift Your Words Carefully

Sift Your Words Carefully.

This post has greater meaning than just what was spoken. If everyone observed words they spoke then their wouldn’t be any regrets, need of apologies or misunderstood remarks. As a writer I have learned that even the smallest words have meaning and that some people view words differently that others. Words are powerful and can cut the heart like a knife. They can bring sorrow to your loved ones and the people you cherish the most. Sift your words is a powerful statement that shouldn’t be overlooked. It should be a lesson guide to each individual. The tongue is an unruly evil full of deadly poison (James 3:8). In Psalm 52:2 it says, “The tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.”
Sometimes it is better not to speak than to say something that you cannot take back. Once said, it is done.

Why Editing is Necessary

If you are a new author than this post is for you.  Most established authors know exactly why editing their manuscript is necesssary.  I will try to cover some of the major reasons on this blog post.

First of all, we need to understand what exactly does editing mean.  Editing is the process of selecting and preparing writtten, visual, audible and film media used to convey information through the processes of correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate, and complete work (Wikipedia: free encyclopedia).

Secondly, editing is important because you want your readers to come back and buy your books.  If your book is hard to understand, your readers will become annoyed and irritated.  If errors are distracting than they may simply put the book down because they can not get into the story-line.  Some people don’t think that misplaced commas matter but let me tell you that they do.

Next, editing your work will cut out the clutter.  You will notice that some things in your manuscript should be left out, due to redundancy and unclear expressions.  They will often bore or confuse the reader.

Last of all, editing is important especially to the publisher.  If you are searching for an agent or a publisher, you need to present your work as clean as possible.  Most agents will put your work down if they cannot get through all the typos, incomplete sentences, comma splices, subject-verb disagreements.  The list goes on and on.

Written by: Tracy Kauffman

Tracy Kauffman is a Christian fiction author of Young Adult and Children Stories.  She grew up in Alabama but has traveled to different parts of the world.  She loves taking cruises and traveling with her family.  Her favorite place that she has been to is the Grand Canyon.

Tracy has an associates degree in Nursing.  She is a registered nurse and works part time in a local nursing home.  The rest of the time she spends her time writing books and marketing them.  Her titles include: Gwendolyn’s Wish, Southern Adventures, Richard the Lionheart, My Boyfriend the Squire and Captain Honey Bear Saves Goldie Locks.

Tracy started writing poetry at a small age and won the title of editor in her school newspaper, when she was in second grade.  She had her first poem published in a online writing contest called, The Cosmetology Student.  She decided to write her first book, Southern Adventures, when her son left home for the Air Force.

She loves writing and hopes to be able to inspire her readers into living a happy healthier life.  She feels like her own life experiences have made her a better writer.  Learn more about her by visiting her website.

Tracy’s website:

http://tracykauffman.yolasite.com

Poem: The Life of a Writer

The Life of a Writer

The Life of a writer is different than you expect,
Writing stories for joy is much easier than all the rest,
Writing for emotions, love, and heart-felt affects,
Busy writing, promoting, no sleep or rest.
We love to use words that move one another,
Words, then phrases, then sentences connected,
A story can take you to lands like no other,
Our desires, hopes, heart is affected.
Fantasy brings to life dragons, magic, and time,
A way to escape troubles, grief, and sorrow,
A story, a novel, and poems that rhyme,
Fiction stories, real life events that we borrow.
The life of a writer is hard at times, but also easy,
For we dedicate our time, energy and imagination,
Writing when we are tired and sometimes queasy,
A different galaxy to us, an internal vacation.

The Importance of Reading

I wanted to share with you why books are so important books and give you some tips on what makes up a book. Not only do we need to know how to write a word or sentence, we need to learn to write paragraphs, essays, and stories. With an active imagination, you can go to other worlds or made up worlds. We can experience new things in a book. Books can change our lives and other people’s lives. Look at some books that have inspired us. What about The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Alice in Wonderland or the Wizard of Oz.

The writers of these books had to learn to write before they could tell their stories. Where do you think their stories came from? Their imagination, their own life experiences. Maybe they got the idea to write a book from watching their uncle deliver mail, or maybe from their animals. They might have had a dog that could chase people up trees. Maybe they had a bird that could sing. There are a lot of characters from books that were made up about real people. One of my books, Southern Adventures is about me. A favorite character will be remembered forever like Clifford the big red dog or Dr. Seuss. One of my favorites is Sami from Gwendolyn’s Wish.

Writing a story or book starts with an imagination and using that imagination to be creative. I ask myself, who is going to be the main character of the story? What is the plot is the events that make up the story? Where is the story going to take place or the setting? The setting is a time such as in the future, the past or present. It is also the place, for example: on a far away countryside or a different world. Reading can make up smarter. Without reading we wouldn’t know anything that we know today. Our forefathers have taught us more than we know.

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A theme, topic, or focus is much different for children, because their ability to grasp material and their awareness to data is much more limited than someone much older. A child’s communication and intellectual skills require memory, understanding and concentration. It is harder for a child with a small attention span to be able to sit down and read a story than a child with a longer one.

Secondly children have to be able to reason and separate what they have read, understand the difference in what is fiction or fantasy.

Next children have to understand vocabulary and understand descriptive language that is talked about in the story.

Last of all, children have to be able to develop their own ideas of what they are reading, from things that they have learned about in the past. You would not talk about a complex topic to a small child that has no possible understanding of the subject.

To be able to write or teach a young child, you have to be able to get down to their level of thinking by considering their intellectual development or understanding capabilities. This can be done by

1. repetition of words,

2. simple sentences vs. complex sentences and

3. the use of pictures for descriptive purposes.

Tracy Kauffman is the author of Southern Adventures, Richard the Lionheart, My Boyfriend the Squire.  To order any of these books you can order through her website at: tracykauffman.com

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Fair Use Act

The use of some of these photo and content are protected under the fair use act under the copyright law. Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 also sets out four factors to be considered in determining whether or not a particular use is fair. 1.The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes 2. The nature of the copyrighted work 3. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole 4. The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

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Sources

I would like to thank the following sources for allowing me to post photos, related text and helpful information on this blog. Sources: Google.com Bing.com Biblegateway.com Merriam Webster dictionary Ask.com Wikipedia.org About.com Pinterest.com
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