Which is Better Words or Pictures

renoir

Recently I saw the film, ‘Words and Pictures’, starring Clive Owens and Juliette Binoche.  The film portrayed an English prep school teacher who loved the art of words as much as his friend, another teacher, loved the art of paintings.  To the painter her work was art and she said, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”  Which wasn’t her quote but was attributed to Frederick R. Barnard.  To the art teacher’s surprise, the English teacher made a compelling case among his students on why words were better than paintings.

To defend his belief, I will use an analogy for demonstration purposes.  A painting can clearly show what a person looks like and what they are doing or wearing, at that precise time in history.  Some may even agree that you can guess what the person is thinking or feeling from a painting by the shape of their lips or the smile on their face. In writing, the author can add so much more to the idea of the observer, such as what he/she ate that morning or where they were before or after that time in history.  A writer can describe their actual feelings on paper and what brought them to feel that sense of pleasure or fear.  A writer can then go on to describe what made them happy or sad; what circumstance made them feel that way.

A writer loves it when their words are able to describe something so precisely that the reader is pulled in to their work of art.  Whether it is a poem, short story or a beginning of something much larger, the art of writing itself can help the reader escape into a place that calms the mind or relaxes their tired muscles as they read word after word.  As they begin reading they can be lying at the beach on a warm sunny day with the wind blowing their hair, as the spray of ocean water mist hits their feet, just as they see sea gulls flying overhead.

Not to try to sway you either way, I will let you be the judge of what you think is better, a painting or an actual poem, literary work or group of words defining a painting. The words that describe the situation, the person or the event as illustrated can not be defined by a simple drawing but by descriptions of thoughts, feelings, and perceptions.  For more information about writing, visit The Writing Coach.’

words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow The Writing Entrepreneur on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Fair Use Act

The use of some of these photo and content are protected under the fair use act under the copyright law. Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 also sets out four factors to be considered in determining whether or not a particular use is fair. 1.The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes 2. The nature of the copyrighted work 3. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole 4. The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

Sources

I would like to thank the following sources for allowing me to post photos, related text and helpful information on this blog. Sources: Google.com Bing.com Biblegateway.com Merriam Webster dictionary Ask.com Wikipedia.org About.com Pinterest.com
%d bloggers like this: