How To Write A Book – Character Development

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Creating characters is an important part of writing because this stage of development determines the outcome of the story. How a character acts, does, says tells the story through his actions, motives and sometimes his appearance. A book wouldn’t be a good one without the characters that are in the story. Imagine reading Alice in Wonderland without having an idea of what Alice was all about. Or reading Tom Sawyer without an idea of his personality and his behaviors. To some authors, creating the character is what they have predetermined in their mind before ever sitting down to write. They may have dreamed about them or perhaps they resemble them in certain ways. See my advice below for helpful tips on Character Development.

1. One part of character development where an author has to make a wise choice is the name. What’s in a Name? Everything. If your reader hates the name they will probably dislike the character and quit reading the story. Consider these names.

1. Joe vs Antonio
2. Mable vs Jasmine
3. Ann vs Alicia
Hopefully you get my point.

2. Now that you have carefully selected your character’s name, give them a personality. You can do this by describing their actions, their demeanor, how mean they are to their peers. This can done through the dialogue or in a descriptive paragraph.
Sometimes it is best to let the reader decide how they are by reading about them. You don’t have to write down every single detail in one paragraph either. Sometimes you might change the personality of the character as your story develops, depending on the plot. It is alright to develop a relationship with them. Act as if you are the character itself. What would you describe to others about yourself.

3. Now that they have a personality, give them an appearance to match their personality. The reader by this point should have made some assumption to how the character looks. Describe their speech, physical attributes, their grooming habits, etc…

See related post: http://writerlaurenclaire.wordpress.com/2013/06/11/6-tips-for-developing-your-characters-by-victoria-grace-howell/

http://accessoriesnotincluded.com/2013/06/11/not-all-bad-not-all-good-either/

http://ezinearticles.com/?More-On-Character-Development&id=7700926

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. rjkeith
    Jun 11, 2013 @ 20:01:36

    Thanks very much for the reference!

    Reply

  2. Trackback: How To Write A Book – Character Development | Kg Books Publishing

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